Your Mission Statement: How to Bring it Alive

“We do chicken right!” was how Col. Harland Sanders, founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, described his product to potential customers and reminded his employees of their obligations to produce a quality product.

In today’s terms, it could be called a mission statement. While it did not include the overly used terms we hear so often now of “world class”, “premiere”, and other superlatives that have become meaningless, it was clear what it meant to him, his employees, and the millions of customers served.
https://marietta-towing.com/wrecker-service/
https://midtowntowingatlanta.com/wrecker-service/
https://southeasternwrecker.com/roadside-assistance/
https://atlanta-roadside-assistance.com/exploring-the-benefits-of-mobile-mount-balance-services/
https://downtowntirerepair.com/the-benefits-of-choosing-mobile-tire-repair-over-traditional-tire-shops/
https://downtowntirerepair.com/the-benefits-of-choosing-mobile-tire-repair-over-traditional-tire-shops/
https://towingcovington.com/wrecker-service/
https://viningstowing.com/tire-change-assistance/
https://viningstowing.com/jump-start/
https://towingcovington.com/locked-out-assistance/

“Good for Col. Sanders” you think, “but how does that help me with my small business? I want a mission statement that will mean something to my organization as it grows. I don’t want to put up some meaningless phrase that sounds good but means nothing! How do I bring it alive?”

That’s what we will go into here – how to bring a mission statement alive so it has meaning to the clients and to the line staff who do most of the work in any organization. To make our case, and build upon “We do chicken right”, let’s go back to the time of Col. Sanders before there was FedEx, UPS, DHL, and their kind.

We will assume we are the founders of a small pa